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November 17, 2014 - A Slow Week Ends in New Highs

| November 18, 2014
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Markets ended a sluggish week of trading slightly up, notching another record close for the S&P 500. For the week, the S&P 500 gained 0.39%, the Dow grew 0.35%, and the Nasdaq added 1.21%.[1]

Though last week's data was sparse, several important economic reports show that investors may have something to be excited about. The latest retail sales data shows that shoppers came out in droves in October, giving sales a 0.3% boost. The rise in sales is even stronger than it appears, because lower gas station sales (caused by falling gas prices) depressed retail sales growth. Excluding volatile categories like automobiles, food, gasoline, and building materials, retail sales surged 0.5%.[2]

Much of the increase can be attributed to lower gas prices - in freefall since July - giving consumers more discretionary income to spend. Gas now averages $2.91 across the nation;[3] if per-gallon prices stay low, we could see a very healthy holiday shopping season.

In another sign of a solid retail season, Wal-Mart (WMT), America's biggest retailer, beat earnings estimates. Same-store sales, often considered a better indicator of organic growth, rose 0.5%, indicating that shoppers are coming back. Many of Wal-Mart's customers are low-income Americans; positive earnings results could show that many of these consumers are no longer feeling the economic pinch.[4]

Americans are also generally feeling much better about their prospects. Consumer sentiment rose in November to more than a seven-year high. Falling unemployment and lower gas prices boosted confidence, though many Americans are still worried about income gains.[5]

The week ahead is heavy with economic data on manufacturing, housing, and inflation, which could cause some volatility as investors digest reports. Analysts are also already thinking about Black Friday and the official start of the year's biggest shopping season. With October's better-than-expected retail sales data, low gas prices, and optimistic consumers, some are forecasting a great season for U.S. retailers. Are these tailwinds baked into stock prices yet? We'll see.

ECONOMIC CALENDAR:

Monday: Empire State Mfg. Survey, Industrial Production
Tuesday: PPI-FD, Housing Market Index, Treasury International Capital
Wednesday: Housing Starts, EIA Petroleum Status Report, FOMC Minutes
Thursday: Consumer Price Index, Jobless Claims, PMI Manufacturing Index Flash, Philadelphia Fed Survey, Existing Home Sales

Notes: All index returns exclude reinvested dividends, and the 5-year and 10-year returns are annualized. Sources: Yahoo! Finance and Treasury.gov. International performance is represented by the MSCI EAFE Index. Corporate bond performance is represented by the DJCBP. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Indices are unmanaged and cannot be invested into directly.

HEADLINES:

Great news: Americans are quitting their jobs. The latest Job Openings and Labor Turnover survey shows that workers are quitting their jobs at the fastest rate since 2008. This trend is another indicator of labor market strength because workers tend to quit jobs when they feel confident in finding better work.[6]

Business inventories rise 0.3% in September. Though sales remained weak, U.S. businesses added to their inventory stockpiles at a faster rate than in August. The modest rise indicates that businesses are optimistic about their ability to sell through inventory in the coming months.[7]

Eurozone growth rates edges upward. The latest economic figures from Europe show that the overall Eurozone grew 0.2% in the third quarter. While Germany and France (Europe's biggest economies) posted anemic growth, Greece roared back from recession, posting 0.7% growth.[8]

Strong dollar and weak oil are helping Americans buy from abroad. While American companies worry about the effect a strong dollar will have on their foreign sales, Americans are benefiting from cheap oil and the strength of the currency to buy overseas goods. September import prices fell by the most in two years, led by a large drop in the cost of imported fuels.[9]


These are the views of Platinum Advisor Marketing Strategies, LLC, and not necessarily those of the named representative, Broker dealer or Investment Advisor, and should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named representative nor the named Broker dealer or Investment Advisor gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. Please consult your financial advisor for further information.


Investing involves risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

Diversification does not guarantee profit nor is it guaranteed to protect assets.

The Standard & Poor's 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted average of 30 significant stocks traded on the New York Stock Exchange and the NASDAQ. The DJIA was invented by Charles Dow back in 1896.

The Nasdaq Composite is an index of the common stocks and similar securities listed on the NASDAQ stock market and is considered a broad indicator of the performance of stocks of technology companies and growth companies.

The MSCI EAFE Index was created by Morgan Stanley Capital International (MSCI) that serves as a benchmark of the performance in major international equity markets as represented by 21 major MSCI indexes from Europe, Australia and Southeast Asia.

The Dow Jones Corporate Bond Index is a 96-bond index designed to represent the market performance, on a total-return basis, of investment-grade bonds issued by leading U.S. companies. Bonds are equally weighted by maturity cell, industry sector, and the overall index.

The S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices are the leading measures of U.S. residential real estate prices, tracking changes in the value of residential real estate. The index is made up of measures of real estate prices in 20 cities and weighted to produce the index.

The 10-year Treasury Note represents debt owed by the United States Treasury to the public. Since the U.S. Government is seen as a risk-free borrower, investors use the 10-year Treasury Note as a benchmark for the long-term bond market.

Google Finance is the source for any reference to the performance of an index between two specific periods.

Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance.

Past performance does not guarantee future results.

You cannot invest directly in an index.

Consult your financial professional before making any investment decision.

Fixed income investments are subject to various risks including changes in interest rates, credit quality, inflation risk, market valuations, prepayments, corporate events, tax ramifications and other factors.

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  1. http://goo.gl/J0G8XU
  2. http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2014/11/14/october-retail-sales/18996467
  3. http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2014/11/14/october-retail-sales/18996467
  4. http://www.cnbc.com/id/102178827
  5. http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/11/14/us-usa-economy-sentiment-idUSKCN0IY1M320141114
  6. http://www.businessinsider.com/jolts-report-november-13-2014-11
  7. http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2014/11/14/business-inventories-up-03-percent/19020379
  8. http://www.marketwatch.com/story/greek-growth-rates-put-germany-eurozone-to-shame-2014-11-14
  9. http://www.cnbc.com/id/102185687
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